increase width

Making running shoes wider

There are two ways to increase width in a technical running shoe.

Go oversize!

 

increase width

 

The first way is to buy a shoe that’s a little longer than usual. As the shoe gets longer it also gets proportionately wider.

In our store, there have been many customers who were wearing shoes longer than necessary. They had never been measured. In just about every case, they had wide feet but didn’t know that about themselves. So they would shop for shoes by putting on different sizes until one of them didn’t feel too tight.

There are some shoe retailers that will give a person an over-sized shoe because the retailer doesn’t carry wide shoes. I am not disparaging the practice. It has helped people find a shoe that they can wear. But there is a disadvantage. Over-sized shoes will have arches that may not be well-positioned with respect to the arches in the wearer’s foot. The shoe’s arches may be too far in front of the wearer’s arches. That can make the shoes feel uncomfortable.

 

Change the lacing to increase width in a shoe.

 

increase width

 

The second way to increase the width of a shoe is to use a straight bar lacing. It’s a lacing technique that reduces the number of times that the laces cross the tongue of the shoe.

If you were a kid in the 80’s, crazy about breakdancing and the fashion that accompanied it, you saw straight bar lacing. (Especially in shell top Adidas with fat laces!)

Wide feet can suddenly feel relief with straight bar lacing. Criss cross lacing can sometimes put an uncomfortable pressure on the insteps of some feet, a pressure that can be immediately relieved with straight bar lacing.

 

Just buy a wide shoe

 

increase width

 

Wide feet need wide shoes. You want a midsole beneath the entire foot. You can only accomplish this if the shoe is the right size and width. Over-sized shoes and straight bar lacing can be helpful. But not as helpful as having the shoe’s midsole completely underfoot. Run Shoe Store has one of the largest selections of wide shoes in the Delaware Valley.

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Phil Clark